New First Nations song by Nooky and Mi-kaisha aims to keep Aboriginal communities safe from COVID-19

STRONG MESSAGE: Aboriginal recording artists Mi-kaisha and Nooky (front), pictured with video clip dancers Maddie Paluch and Chandler Connell, collaborated to write the song, 'One Point 5', encouraging young people to keep their communities safe from COVID-19. Photo: Jake Keane
STRONG MESSAGE: Aboriginal recording artists Mi-kaisha and Nooky (front), pictured with video clip dancers Maddie Paluch and Chandler Connell, collaborated to write the song, 'One Point 5', encouraging young people to keep their communities safe from COVID-19. Photo: Jake Keane

Two Aboriginal recording artists have collaborated with NSW Health to produce a new song encouraging young Indigenous people to keep themselves and their communities safe from COVID-19.

The track, One Point 5, has been co-written and performed by Darumbal, Murri and Tongan R&B artist Mi-kaisha and Yuin hip hop artist Nooky, and produced by First Nations media, communication and events agency 33 Creative in partnership with the NSW Health Centre for Aboriginal Health to complement the NSW Government's Keep our Mob Safe campaign.

With Aboriginal people at greater risk of serious illness and death from COVID-19, the song is designed to speak to Aboriginal youth about their role in keeping their communities, families and elders safe.

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In the song, Mi-kaisha and Nooky encourage the continued practices of social distancing, hand washing and wearing masks in public spaces.

"It's a critical time in the fight against COVID-19," Nooky said.

"It's important for our mob to know that we've still got to practice social distancing, good hygiene, washing our hands, things like that, and that's what this track is about, helping get that message out there.

"I know our mob want to hang out with family but we've got to think of other people during this, especially our elders. I know things are tough but we'll get through it together."

Key themes of the song include keeping a safe distance from others, keeping in contact with people during isolation, and drawing strength from the Aboriginal cultural sense of family and community connectedness.

"I was motivated to be part of this project because I knew how important it was to amplify Indigenous voices and the message of keeping mob safe during the pandemic," Mi-Kaisha said.

"I knew how greatly COVID-19 had impacted the wellbeing of our mob and wanted to create music with a message of encouragement.

"I hope it reassures people and encourages our mob to continue to stay COVID safe. We encourage everyone to keep social distancing, washing hands, even wearing a mask in public spaces and doing what we can to stop the spread."

The video clip, recorded in Sydney's inner-city suburb of Redfern, features choreography by Yuin, Bundjalung, Munanjali, Gamillaraay and Murray Island nations man, Darren Compton.

The track and accompanying video clip forms an important part of the multi-pronged approach the NSW government is taking to communicating about COVID-19.

For the latest information on COVID-19, visit nsw.gov.au.