'Yarn Up Feel Deadly' mental health app launched for 2019 NAIDOC Week

Hunter New England Mental Health Services executive director Dr Marcia Fogarty with Aboriginal professional mental health trainee Brent Munro at Moree Hospital's NAIDOC Week celebrations.
Hunter New England Mental Health Services executive director Dr Marcia Fogarty with Aboriginal professional mental health trainee Brent Munro at Moree Hospital's NAIDOC Week celebrations.

As part of the 2019 NAIDOC Week celebrations, Hunter New England Local Health District (HNELHD) and Aboriginal Mental Health Service have launched a new smart phone application.

'Yarn Up Feel Deadly' is an app that aims to provide useful information about accessing mental health services for Aboriginal and non Aboriginal people in the district.

Along with important information about services in the area, the app includes Aboriginal and non Aboriginal video testimonies of people sharing their mental health stories.

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It was inspired by district manager for Aboriginal Mental Health Services Bron Rose's experiences listening to stories of her grandmother and was then encouraged to film Aboriginal Elders in the community sharing their mental health stories to help others in the community.

The app also contains a pre-survey and post-survey where users can give their feedback on how they feel about accessing mental health services before and after using the app.

Brent Munro is currently studying a Bachelor of Health Science and Mental Health at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga and is the new Aboriginal professional mental health trainee at Moree Hospital.

Mr Munro, who is training to become a professional counsellor, was at Moree Hospital's NAIDOC Week celebrations on Tuesday encouraging people to take the app surveys.

"It's just about how an Aboriginal person rates the services and how they connect with it," Mr Munro said.

The 'Yarn Up Feel Deadly' app is available for both iPhone and Android devices.