Moree Hospital Oncology Unit making good use of 2018 Moree Weebolla Bulls Ladies Day donation

Moree Hospital acute health service manager Bronwyn Cosh, community health manager Anne Lemmon with one of the care packs, palliative care clinical nurse consultant Sally Laurie with the portable oxygen concentrator, pictured with Ladies Day committee members Nicole Youngberry and Jess Thompson and Bulls president Paul King.
Moree Hospital acute health service manager Bronwyn Cosh, community health manager Anne Lemmon with one of the care packs, palliative care clinical nurse consultant Sally Laurie with the portable oxygen concentrator, pictured with Ladies Day committee members Nicole Youngberry and Jess Thompson and Bulls president Paul King.

Moree Hospital has so far made good use of the sizeable donation the Moree Weebolla Bulls Ladies Day committee made to the Oncology Unit last year.

The Ladies Day committee donated $30,000 to the Oncology Unit following the most successful Ladies Day to date.

The committee recently caught up with hospital staff to find out how their donation had been spent.

A third of the money, $10,000, has gone to Moree Can Assist to support local families affected by cancer, while the Oncology Unit has been able to purchase a portable oxygen concentrator, worth about $5,000, which provides patients greater flexibility and allows them to travel while receiving oxygen.

The money has also been used to put together care packages which cancer patients receive at the start of their treatment.

The packages contain some essentials that people might need while undergoing treatment, such as non-perfurmed sorbolene cream and paw paw lip ointment for dry skin and lips, a thermometer to check their temperature, hand wipes and hand sanitiser which are very important to stop the spread of germs while their immune systems are low, goat milk soap, tissues for watery eyes, mints to cover the metallic taste patients often get in their mouths, and a pen and a notepad which always comes in handy during appointments.

"It's just the little things you don't realise you need when getting treatment," palliative care clinical nurse consultant Sally Laurie said.

"Without this money, we wouldn't be able to provide this."

Each package comes with a handwritten note from the Ladies Day committee.

After all that, there's still $11,000 leftover, which Moree Hospital acute health service manager Bronwyn Cosh said will be spent when a need arises.

"We don't just spend money for the sake of spending it," she said.

"We'll wait until we've got something to spend it on."

Ms Cosh said the great thing about the donation is that it can be spent on things that the hospital wouldn't normally be able to purchase through the government-approved system.

That way, the hospital is also able to spend money locally - such as on the items in the care package - which goes back to supporting the community.

"The more money that goes back into the local community, the better off we are as a club because the community is so generous in supporting us," Moree Rugby Union Club president Paul King said.

Ms Cosh thanked the committee for choosing the Oncology Unit as last year's Ladies Day fundraiser.

This year's Ladies Day and the Bulls Ball will support the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service - Moree Support Group to assist in ensuring that this vital service can continue to provide assistance to the Moree and surrounding local communities, free of charge.