Bank Art Museum Moree increases community access to Moree Plains Shire Council's art collection

BRIGHTENING WALLS: Bank Art Museum Moree's Anna Jackman, Vivien Clyne and Kate Tuart with acting Mehi sector general manager Anne Lemmon and acute health service manager Bronwyn Cosh pictured with some of the collection artworks on display in the specialist clinics waiting room - one of the many rooms in Moree Hospital to now display artworks from council's collection.
BRIGHTENING WALLS: Bank Art Museum Moree's Anna Jackman, Vivien Clyne and Kate Tuart with acting Mehi sector general manager Anne Lemmon and acute health service manager Bronwyn Cosh pictured with some of the collection artworks on display in the specialist clinics waiting room - one of the many rooms in Moree Hospital to now display artworks from council's collection.

Artworks from Bank Art Museum Moree’s (BAMM) public art collection, owned by Moree Plains Shire Council, are brightening the walls of various buildings in Moree in an effort to increase the community’s access to the works.

Over the past few months, the team at BAMM have been busy installing about 20 artworks in different rooms throughout Moree Hospital to give patients and staff something to look at, while making the areas less “sterile”.

There are also a number of artworks installed on the walls of council’s offices, as well as in Moree Community Library and the Dhiiyaan Aboriginal Centre, with plans to extend the collection display to other locations in town.

“It’s about improving access to the collection, as well as decorating walls,” BAMM director Vivien Clyne said.

“We’ve got so many artworks that don’t get out often, maybe only once every two years.

“This is a nice way for them to become accessible to the whole community, as a range of different people will see them.”

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The artworks are part of council’s art collection, which is cared for by BAMM, with a mix of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal artworks – many by local artists – placed on the walls of the various community spaces.

“We tried to give a mixture of different styles and mediums so everyone could see a big range,” Ms Clyne said.

Acting Hunter New England Health Mehi sector general manager Anne Lemmon said the artworks make a big difference, warming up the rooms in the hospital.

“I think it adds interest and makes the rooms less clinical,” she said.

“It increases a sense of belonging for clients accessing these areas.

“We’re very grateful for the community supporting us once again.”